First Date

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photo credit: A Mixed Bag (Al Forbes)

“Are you kidding me! This has got to be the worse movie ever!”

Deb’s remarks vibrated throughout entire theater, answered with a resounding ‘SHHHHH’.

Wyatt tried to calm her down.

“Baby, please, you’re disturbing everyone.”

Deb lowered her voice but not her insolence.

“I can’t believe you brought me to this…. whatever you call this movie.”

Plan 9 from Outer Space. It’s a classic.”

“It’s crap Wyatt. OMG, do you see the strings attached to the planets? What kind of person brings a first date to a movie like this?”

“I thought you’d like it. You said you liked Sci-Fi.”

“I like Star Wars. Real science fiction. My little brother could do better with his Legos and a point-and-shoot camera.”

A few moments later, Deb stood up and announced she was leaving.

“Can you get me some popcorn when you come back?”

“No Wyatt, I’m leaving the theater. For good. And don’t bother calling me again.”

After Deb walked out, the man in the seat behind Wyatt tapped him on the shoulder.

“Man, tough break, but good riddance is all I can say. How could anyone not like this stuff.”

 

Sunday Photo Fiction is a weekly challenge to write a 200-word story based on a photo prompt. As a fan of horrible science fiction, this was a no-brainer. 

 Old Crow

Kika and his brother Hakan were walking through the woods in search of blueberries for Grandmother’s pie. Across the stream, Hakan noticed a bush ripe with berries.

“There are enough berries for two pies on that bush,” said Hakan, stepping into the stream.

In the tree above sat Old Crow, cawing “Danger, Danger.” Hearing the warning, Kika pleaded with his brother to return. “Do you not hear Old Crow?” he asked.

“That old bird is a trickster. He wants the berries for himself.”

Old Crow persisted with each step Hakan took, but the berries were too inviting for Hakan to return. When Hakan safely reached the other shore, he turned to Old Crow and laughed.

“Maybe I will leave a berry or two for your dinner.” He then filled his basket with the juicy berries.

By now Hakan was hungry and it would be hours before Grandmother baked the pie. As Hakan placed a handful of berries in his mouth, Old Crow cawed even louder than before. But his warning was unheeded and within moments, Hakan’s stomach burned in pain, causing him to fall into the stream. The berries had been poison.

With that, Old Crow flew away.

 

I hope you enjoyed my story. Flash Fiction for the Purposeful Practitioner is a weekly challenge to write a 200-word story, inspired by a photography. Stories for this week can be found at flash-fiction-for-the-purposeful-practitioner-2017-week-32

 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge – small subjects

This week’s topic is Small Subjects. Size is relative, as I hope to show in the following three photos. The first is a run-of-the-mill grasshopper, found in everyone’s yard during the hot Oklahoma summer months. Sometimes it seems like my entire yard is nothing more than a grasshopper haven.

Nature Grasshopper

Small grasshopper

 

 

Mother and Child on beach

Mother and Child on beach

The second photo is mother and child on the beach. The mother watches as the small boy investigates the wet sand. She is ready to take action in case her little boy decides to explore too much.

New York City Skyline

New York City Skyline

Nothing about New York City could be considered small, but when you look from afar at the New York skyline, soaring World One Trade Center diminishes all others.

 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Small Subjects

The Coming Storm

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PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Tornados rarely formed during the hot Oklahoma summer, but the still, humid air signaled a coming storm. Joe stood on his porch, watching. Hearing footsteps, he turned and saw a man standing a few feet away, a baseball bat in hand.

“Jesus Boone, you scared the shit out of me. What’s up with the….”

The bat connected with Joe’s head before he could finish the sentence. Toppling off the porch, Joe landed in the dirt, blood pooling in the dead grass. As thunder clapped, Boone raced toward the road.

Standing in the shadows of the front door, a small figure watched everything.

<<count 102>>

This story was inspired by Rochelle Wisoff-Field’s Friday Fictioneer’s . Thanks to Rochelle for providing this week’s photo.

 

Sunday Photo Fiction – Never Goodbye

 

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Photo Prompt by Al Forbes

Theirs’s was a romance that was never quite in synch.

They met by chance, in an off-the-beaten-path coffee shop, far from home. In that absent-minded way of his that she learned to love, he bumped into her, spilling coffee all over her blouse.

Embarrassed and apologetic, he offered to pay for the cleaning.

“Only if you have dinner with me,” she said. “Wear the bow-tie. It suits you.”

They hit it off at once, soul-mates one might say. Both were avid travelers, but their travels rarely took them to the same place. For many years they never knew when they would see each other again, but he was always there when she needed him.

Sadly, nothing lasts forever and they knew their time together was about to end. Trouble was, he did not like endings.

They met for the last time where it all began. She bought the coffee. He told her the only way he could accept her leaving was to believe they might see each other again someday.

“I must believe it is possible,” he said.

“What would you have me say?” she asked.

“Say good-bye as if you will be coming back.”

“Well then…See you around.”

 

Sunday Photo Fiction is a weekly challenge to write a short 200-word story inspired by a photograph. This week’s photo is provided by Al Forbes.  The final dialogue of this story was loosely taken from the May 18, 2013 Doctor Who episode called “The Name of the Doctor”, in which River Song and The Doctor say good-bye for the last time.

Bus Stops, Bus Goes

bus

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Alice waits at the bus stop, remembering. Thoughts of how quickly everything changed often filled her mind when not otherwise occupied. Once she had a wonderful job, a caring husband. A home and family. Without notice, it all disappeared.

Alice, that’s not true, they said. There were signs.

Why spoil happiness? she would reply.

At least she had the ragged blue sweater, bought at Goodwill, to keep her warm.

The B-2 bus pulls away from King’s station, moving toward Ocean Avenue. Ed knows the route by heart. Ten years a driver and God willing, he would drive for 10 more. The job keeps food on his table but not much more. Most fares were OK and he could handle the occasional trouble-makers. Just kids with too much time on their hands.

At Ocean, the bus slows to a stop and the doors open. A lady in a blue sweater steps in. She tells the driver she doesn’t have enough change. Her eyes look sad.

Go sit down. Bring it next time,” says Ed.

“Bless you,” says Alice.

Some things never change. God willing.

Shutting the doors, Ed pulls the bus into traffic and heads for his next stop.

 

198 words